Reports

This Policy Brief defines and describes the Tor-York West megazone (TYW), one of three regionally, provincially, and nationally significant employment zones identified in the Neptis Foundation report Planning for Prosperity.
Author(s):
Pamela Blais
Report (2017)
This Policy Brief defines and describes the Tor-York East megazone (TYE), one of three regionally, provincially, and nationally significant employment zones identified in the Neptis Foundation report Planning for Prosperity.
Author(s):
Pamela Blais
Report (2017)
This report takes a closer look at the Airport Megazone, one of the three suburban employment megazones identified in the 2015 report, Planning for Prosperity, and the second largest concentration of employment in Canada.
Author(s):
Pamela Blais
Report (2016)
This report maps and analyzes the dynamics of long-term structural changes – not merely cyclical market fluctuations – brought about by globalization and rapidly evolving technology in the economy of the Greater Golden Horseshoe. The report concludes that the Growth Plan for the GGH is not grounded in the reality of the region’s economic geography.
Author(s):
Pamela Blais
Report (2015)
This report compares the 2001–2011 growth patterns of the Greater Toronto and Hamilton Area, where growth continues mainly on greenfields, and Metro Vancouver, which grew mainly through intensification, especially along frequent transit corridors.
Author(s):
Marcy Burchfield and Anna Kramer
Report (2015)
Understanding the implications of land budgets
Neptis has prepared this discussion paper to answer three questions. (1) How does the Growth Plan for the Greater Golden Horseshoe work? (2) Is the region running out of land for development? (3) Have development patterns changed since the Plan was established? The findings are intended to contribute to the 10-year review of the Plan.
Author(s):
Neptis Foundation
Report (2015)
Population Growth vs Designated Land
This study, the first comprehensive review of the Plan and its outcomes to date, paints a picture of an innovative, award-winning plan under pressure and behind schedule.
Author(s):
Rian Allen and Philippa Campsie
Report (2013)
Growing Cities compares three Canadian metropolitan areas: Calgary, Toronto, and Vancouver; through spatial analysis and planning policies. Highlighting that each of the cities developed distinctly given the climate of planning and provincial interests.
Author(s):
Zack Taylor, Marcy Burchfield, Byron Moldofsky, Jo Ashley
Report (2010)
This paper analyzes and describes the Province's intensification target both in principle and in practice.
Author(s):
Marcy Burchfield
Report (2010)
Effects of retail on transportation patterns
Author(s):
Ron Buliung, Tony Hernandez
Report (2009)
This study investigates how density impacts the way an area functions by studying various parameters.
Author(s):
Zack Taylor, John van Nostrand
Report (2008)
Urban Growth Centres and transit corridors are central to the Places to Grow plan, this report traces the importance of these two concepts historically while highlighting facets that contribute to the making of successful nodes and corridors.
Author(s):
Pierre Filion
Report (2007)
The report highlights effects of long-term business cycles on population growth and housing demand.
Author(s):
Will Dunning
Report (2006)
Based on personal interviews with 64 farmers in six locales around the region, this study sheds light on important matters such as the financial stability of farming operations, what farmers think about agricultural land preservation, and the degree of farmers’ commitment to farming. Their findings suggest that the future of farming in the region is uncertain, and may be endangered.
Author(s):
Michael Bunce, Jeanne Maurer
Report (2005)
What is the likelihood that Greenlands present today will persist in the future?
Author(s):
Donald M. Fraser, Bernard P. Neary
Report (2004)
Why Simcoe County plays an important role in the urban future of the region.
Author(s):
Leah Birnbaum, Lorenzo Nicolet, Zack Taylor
Report (2004)
Most people who live and work in the Toronto region assume that housing and travel costs vary according to where one lives. But if so, how exactly does the pattern play out in the region? Does one save, overall, by living in the suburbs?
Author(s):
Eric J. Miller
Report (2004)
The report looks at the history of Metro's Toronto's infrastructure. Expanding on water supply, sewage treatment facilities, and roads – since the Second World War, the report looks at the historical relationshipbetween the construction of the region’s physical infrastructure and the expansion of the region’s urban land use.
Author(s):
Richard White
Report (2003)
Merely directing growth to established to outlying centres in the region, without implementing other changes, does not lead to significant improvements in traffic congestion of environmental quality.
Author(s):
IBI Group, Dillon Consulting, Metropole Consulting.
Report (2003)
More of the same type of development means more of the same type of problem
Author(s):
IBI Group, Dillon Consulting, Metropole Consulting
Report (2002)
As part of the Portriat of a Region series, this study provides an overview of the physical geography of the Toronto region, including geological regions, watercourses and watersheds, environmentally significant areas, and agricultural land. The report includes a detailed study of six areas, each 2 kilometres by 2 kilometres, in different parts of the region, each developed during a different time period. These case studies show how typical road patterns, development densities, and arrangements of land uses have changed from the early 20th century to the late 1990s.
Author(s):
Robert Wright
Report (2001)
As part of the Portrait of a Region series, this study describes recent trends in municipal revenues and expenditures and compares the fiscal arrangements of the different municipalities within the Greater Toronto Area. The author also looks at the public finance implications of Local Services Realignment (the shift in responsibility for certain services from the provincial to municipal governments), the 1998 amalgamation of six cities into the current City of Toronto, and changes in the property tax assessment system.
Author(s):
Enid Slack
Report (2001)
As part of the Portrait of a Region series, this report examines the growth trends of the 1990s in the Greater Toronto Area. The study analyses planning policies and development trends relating to urban areas, agricultural areas, environmentally significant areas, and rural areas, in light of the scale and pace of change in the region, to determine whether and how quickly the region is moving towards the goal of "sustainable" development.
Author(s):
Pamela Blais
Report (2000)
As part of the Portrait of a Region series, this study uses key economic indicators to provide an overview of the economy of the Toronto region at the opening of the 21st century. The study compares Toronto's economy to that of other North American city-regions, highlights the major economic trends of the past 20 years, and assesses the future prospects of the region.
Author(s):
Meric S. Gertler
Report (2000)
As part of the Portrait of a Region series, this study is based on the Transportation Tomorrow Survey, a survey of daily travel patterns by residents of the Greater Toronto Area and Hamilton, conducted every five years. The study shows trends in commuting and other travel, automobile ownership, the use of automobiles vs. other forms of transportation, and the relationship of transportation networks and patterns to urban form.
Author(s):
Eric Miller, Amer Shalaby
Report (2000)
As part of the Portrait of a Region series, this overview describes the demographic characteristics of the Toronto region, including population growth and aging, migration and immigration trends, changes in household composition and formation over the past 30 years, patterns of social and ethnic diversity, and income distribution and inequalities. In addition to describing the long-term trends, the study includes maps showing the spatial distribution of particular groups and household types.
Author(s):
Larry Bourne
Report (2000)