Briefs

This is the fourth in a series of Briefs on the land supply for future urban development designated by municipalities across the Greater Golden Horseshoe to accommodate growth to 2031 and beyond. This Brief examines the land supply represented by Undelineated Built-up Areas (UBUAs) – rural settlements identified by the Province as being without full municipal water and wastewater servicing. Although the Growth Plan states that these small towns, villages, and hamlets should not be a focus of growth, a contradiction between the Growth Plan and a supplementary provincial document allows municipalities to count subdivisions on the edges of UBUAs as “intensification.”
Brief (2017)
This is the third in a series of Briefs on the land supply for future urban development designated by municipalities across the Greater Golden Horseshoe to accommodate growth to 2031. This Brief sums up the supply of land in (a) the Designated Greenfield Area (DGA), (b) unbuilt areas within Undelineated Built-up Areas (UBUAs), (c) land added through boundary changes to Barrie and Brantford and (d) Amendment 1 to the Growth Plan.
Brief (2017)
This is the second in a series of Briefs on the land supply for future urban development designated by municipalities across the Greater Golden Horseshoe to accommodate growth to 2031. This Brief examines the question of serviced land in the Greater Toronto and Hamilton Area (GTHA). The first looked at how much land has been built on in the past decade in the GTHA and concluded that only 20% of the total greenfield land supply until 2031 has been built on. Future Briefs will look at the rate of consumption of greenfield lands in Outer Ring municipalities beyond the Greenbelt and other lands that are part of future settlement areas, even though they are not part of the Designated Greenfield Area.
Brief (2016)
Land Supply GTHA 2016
This is the first in a series of Briefs that will examine the land supply for future urban development designated by municipalities across the Greater Golden Horseshoe to accommodate growth to 2031. This Brief examines the amount of land that has been built on in the GTHA since the establishment of the Growth Plan for the Greater Golden Horseshoe in 2006.
Brief (2016)
In August 2014, newspaper headlines trumpeted the “Manhattanization” of Toronto. City Council, in the span of two days, approved 18 new high-rise apartment and office buildings in downtown Toronto, on top of 70,000 residential units already approved for construction. But what happens in downtown Toronto is only a small part of a much larger story of growth across the Greater Toronto and Hamilton Area (GTHA).
Author(s):
Neptis
Brief (2015)
Neptis analysis show that of the 56,200 hectares designated for urbanization between 2006 and 2031 in the Greater Toronto and Hamilton Area, only 9% was actually built on between 2006 and 2011. This finding suggests that the remainder of the land supply is likely to last well beyond 2031.
Author(s):
The Neptis Foundation
Analysis, Brief (2015)
Four Canadian Urban Regions
Preliminary findings from the Neptis Foundation showing how four major Canadian cities have grown in the past 20 years indicate that while the populations of the Vancouver, Edmonton, Calgary, and Toronto city-regions continue to expand, the rate at which new land is being urbanized at the edge has decreased over time – sometimes quite dramatically.
Author(s):
Neptis Foundation
Brief (2014)
Smart pricing – with zone fares, integration with GO, and lower off-peak fares – could be structured to create more winners than losers.
Author(s):
Michael Schabas
Brief (2014)
There are important questions that need to be asked, including what each provincial leader or mayoral candidate will do to bring the 416 and 905 together as one region to make transportation decisions that will benefit us all.
Author(s):
Neptis Foundation
Brief (2014)
What we are far from doing is upgrading the network across the region, most of which still lacks frequent express rail service. And the current version of The Big Move emphasizes local transit routes over regional express rail. Why?
Author(s):
Neptis
Brief (2014)
Without cumulative information on the progress of 21 single- and upper-tier municipalities and 89 lower-tier municipalities as they adopt and implement the Plan’s requirements, there's no big picture, no sense of how municipalities compare with one other, and how the various municipal plans all add up.
Author(s):
Neptis
Brief (2013)